Crossroads

As often happens with this blog, I don’t really know what to write. I just feel the need to get something out of my head. Sometimes, it’s something that I’ve seen or heard that’s touched a nerve. Others are me trying to make some kind of sense out of the jumble of thoughts and feelings that swirl about me. This post is a result of the latter. I’ll warn you now, a lot’s happened in a short space of time. This is likely to be a very long read. Give it a while and it’ll be serialised over a week on Radio 4, read by an actor whose voice you recognise, but whose name you can’t quite place.

MW is in hospital with an infection. At least the fourth or fifth in a row. She’s been diagnosed as having a urinary tract infection (UTI). This is the risk you run with a suprapubic catheter – one that’s permanently inserted through your skin into your bladder. She’s needed a catheter for a few years now. UTIs come and go with, now nonchalant, regularity. These infections vary in severity – sometimes to the point of requiring an emergency ambulance. This was one of those times.

As I have been informed, MW is a sepsis risk and any time she passes little or no urine either through the catheter or by bypassing the catheter and urinating normally is a real cause for concern. Medical treatment is required immediately. We’d been giving MW oral antibiotics by the bucket recently but she didn’t seem to improve. Confusion and delirium, along with being overly sleepy and/or unresponsive, were the signs that something was definitely amiss.

What I wasn’t prepared for was the conversation I had with a specialist. The specialist. I’ve written before about how I don’t really notice deteriorations in MW’s condition – I see her all the time, so changes are too small to take in – it’s only when there’s a catalyst event that it all makes sense. This was one hell of a catalyst event. The conversation was stark and I wasn’t prepared for it. “We ought to discuss what happens when MW has an infection that they can’t bring round? Do we want them to resuscitate?” Sorry, what?

MW has deteriorated a lot since the specialist last saw her. Swallowing and breathing have both been compromised to a degree. That’s due in part to the morphine patches being administered. But taking away the patch would bring back the pain. It’s a shitty trade off. Also, the MS is making her weaker. Her nerves are increasingly damaged. It would be a good idea to have a PEG feeding tube inserted into her stomach. But only if it’s assessed that she can withstand the surgery.

A PEG would give better access, long term, for administering meds and fluids/nutrition. Explaining this to MW is easy. She’s already agreed that it would be a good idea. She was quite animated when she agreed, but I don’t know how much of that was independent thought and how much was her just going along with the explanation given by the specialist. Explaining something that has obvious benefits is much easier than trying to get her thoughts on whether she wants to be resuscitated or not if she arrests.

Do Not Resuscitate. DNR. I sometimes hate the way that abbreviations can, on the surface, trivialise very important matters. A DNR order. Fucking hell!! Am I prepared to just allow her to ‘slip away’? “I’m not saying it’s going to happen tomorrow, next week or next month…”. No, but we’re no longer playing with hypotheticals, are we? This is a when and not if. This isn’t life insurance for the ‘just in case’. It’s planning for an eventuality expected in the not-too-distant future that I’m perfectly happy to stick my head in the sand over.

This brings with it a ton of questions. Is staying at home in her best interests? Particularly as I can’t watch over her 24/7. What if I miss something? I’m not medically trained. I panic at the slightest thing as it is. I can’t – and don’t want to – make an arbitrary decision about a care home but I’m not sure I’m emotionally equipped to continue what I’ve been doing. I’m fucking scared!!!! I don’t know what to do. What I do know is that people are looking at me for answers. This isn’t a conversation that MW has ever been willing to instigate and, now, I doubt she’s able to.

So, to the crossroads – own home or care home? I’m at a point where I know a decision needs to be made or, at least, a timetable needs to be drawn up for making sure MW gets the best care. Every attempt at drawing a conclusion only brings more questions. And in the middle of it all is a 50 year-old woman who didn’t ask for any of this. A woman who is incredibly vulnerable. A woman who, in her more lucid moments, is probably very scared. A woman who still smiles despite all the pain, all the infections, all the being pushed and pulled about, and never complains. And I don’t know how to have these conversations with her. I just don’t know what to do.

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